The Small Press Network’s Podcast
#IPC19 Fundamentals of Publishing: Rights and Royalties

#IPC19 Fundamentals of Publishing: Rights and Royalties

May 1, 2020

Contracts guru Alex Adsett will guide you through the complex world of buying and selling rights, and calculating royalties.

#IPC19 Fundamentals of Publishing Keynote: Malcolm Neil

#IPC19 Fundamentals of Publishing Keynote: Malcolm Neil

May 1, 2020

Malcolm Neil, while based in Melbourne, has worked throughout the region over the last ten years. Based on his experiences of the last few years working as a consultant in Australia, New Zealand and South East Asia, he will briefly explore how he sees the markets changing in the region, and then will respond questions submitted in advance.

#IPC19 Trade Session: Diverse Children’s Publishing

#IPC19 Trade Session: Diverse Children’s Publishing

May 1, 2020

Books for children are now as diverse as the communities we live in. Join Liz Allen (Lost in Books), Elise Jones (Allen & Unwin), author Lisa Fuller and author and editor Demet Divaroran. Chaired by Kate O’Donnell (The Younger Sun).

#IPC19 Trade Keynote: Toni Jordan: On Being Published

#IPC19 Trade Keynote: Toni Jordan: On Being Published

May 1, 2020

With Mary Dalmau

Bestselling and award-winning author Toni Jordan will discuss her perspectives on being edited and published, dealing with publicity and promotions, TV and film adaptations and international translations, followed by a Q&A with legendary bookseller Mary Dalmau.

Toni Jordan is the author of five novels. Her work has been longlisted and shortlisted for a multitude of prizes, and is published by Melbourne-based Text Publishing. She has previously been a judge for the Small Press Network’s Most Underrated Book Award.

#IPC19 Industry Research: Digital and Virtual Sites of Publishing

#IPC19 Industry Research: Digital and Virtual Sites of Publishing

May 1, 2020

‘Global self-publishing and a multitude of local laws’ by Rita Matulionyte, University of Newcastle

‘Kickstarting book projects through creativity, connectivity and crowdfunding’ by Claire Parnell, University of Melbourne

‘The Gram, The Grid, and Genre: #bookstagram and the impact of image-based systems of classification in post-digital book culture’ by Kenna MacTavish, University of Melbourne

#IPC19 Industry Research Keynote: Mary Poppins’ Publishing Compass

#IPC19 Industry Research Keynote: Mary Poppins’ Publishing Compass

May 1, 2020

Professor Claire Squires, University of Stirling

Inspired by a scene from PL Travers’ Mary Poppins (1934), in which a magical box opens up perspectives to the north, south, east and west, this keynote goes on a journey structured around four points of a ‘publishing compass’, responding to the following questions (not necessarily in this order). In so doing, it thinks through a series of pressing issues for publishing and publishing research, and interrogates how we might set our coordinates in order best to navigate through them as both researchers and practitioners of publishing:

Publishing Geographies: the spatial organisation of publishing has long been global, but determined along lines which continually reassert hierarchical structures of power, the less than equal ‘world republic of letters’ (Casanova) which privileges certain languages, countries, and metropolitan centres. How might local, regional, ‘remote’, peripheral and digital activity be disrupting, shoring up or diverging from such patternings? Is the publishing map being redrawn, and if so, in what ways?

Publishing Epistemologies: as the publishing industries face increasing disruption, challenge and opportunity in their operations, how do structures of knowledge make sense of the current state and future shape of those industries? What is the role of the academic researcher, and which creative and critical modes might be employed to understand, or intervene in publishing’s directions? And what place might the small Scottish Highlands town of Ullapool take in such concerns?

Publishing Responsibilities: independent publishers have frequently taken a role in directing publishing’s moral, cultural and political compass. In an age of ongoing inequalities, hastening climate crisis and geopolitical upheaval, how might publishers, and publishing studies academics, respond to such challenges, take action to address them, develop socially just post-growth economic structures, and plan for responsible futures?

Publishing Imaginaries: what might future ‘imagined communities’ (Anderson) generated by publishing look like, and by which dystopian and utopian visions of the future might we want to navigate in order to create them?

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